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Category Archives: CONVENIOS

Decisions of the meeting between the ADP and environmental organizations to present the Dominican School Responds to Climate Change Program, Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Santo Domingo,

Thursday Sept 28

Last Tuesday, September 26th, representatives of the environmental movement of the country met with the Dominican Association of Teachers (ADP), at its national headquarters in the city of Santo Domingo, D. N., in order to meet and exchange about the Dominican School Responds to Climate Change Program. This proposal was prepared by the ADP, under the guidance of 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Rajendra K. Pachauri, and with input from environmental organizations. The Autonomous University of Santo Domingo (UASD), also participated in this meeting, which is in the process of formalizing its participation in the Program through a framework agreement signed with the ADP.

From the exchange on the Program, the following conclusions and commitments were reached:

  1. Make all general, sectoral and bilateral preparations and agreements during the remaining months of 2017, in order to start with the Program beginning January 1st of next year, 2018. The Program will be launched before the end of 2017, if possible with the participation of Dr. Pachauri.
  1. The UASD makes its resources, its virtual, institutional and physical platform, available to the Program. Also resources for hosting and publishing materials. At the end of the first year of the Program, a publication should be published containing the contents and progress of the Program, especially its diploma.
  1. The environmental movement undertook to provide specialized teachers for the diploma to participate in it, and select the place where it will interact with the program in order to accompany the schools and contribute to the development of small initiatives and projects on climate change or intervention in the climatic vulnerability of the area where the schools are located. In this sense, in the next two weeks, the organizations will have to send the personal data and CVs of potential teachers who will give classes in the diploma, indicating the specific topic of the program. The UASD will provide the profile of these teachers after it is reviewed by Dr. Pachauri
  1. Ask Dr. Pachauri to manage highly recognized international teachers in the field of climate change to participate in the diploma, both remotely and virtually as well as in face-to-face visits to DR.
  1. Environmental organizations are in the best position to sign any agreements that may be necessary to launch and set up the Program.

The meeting also discussed three other topics: a) The program of activities of Dr. Pachauri’s stay in DR; b) Post-ratification actions of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change; and c) The verdict of the TC supporting the non-admission of the Superior Administrative Tribunal of preventive environmental protection against the construction of the Punta Catalina coal plants. On these aspects, it was decided:

(a) Program of Dr. Rajendra K. Pacharuri’s stay:

– The celebration of four master lectures in Santiago de los Caballeros, Barahona, Baní and San Pedro de Macorís.

– Do everything possible to ensure that Dr. Pachauri is invested with a doctorate Honoris Causa that will most likely be approved by the Cláustro Menor of the UASD on October 28, during his next stay in DR. Master lecture given after his investiture, in the UASD with the support of the ADP and the Dominican environmental movement.

– Celebration of a major launch event for the Dominican School Responds to Climate Change program, chaired by Dr. Pachauri.

The date and other details of these activities will be decided at a later date when we have the date of Dr. Rajendra and Dr. Aachauri’s arrival in the country, possibly between late November and early December of this year.

  1. b) On post-Ratification activities of the Paris Accord on Climate Change:

Subscription of joint declaration requesting President Danilo Medina, the National Congress and the Dominican Corporation of State Electric Companies (CDEEE) to convert the Punta Catalina coal plants to natural gas. Organizations will seek the endorsement of this statement from other organizations with which they have a close relationship.

Press conference to make the joint statement public.

At a special meeting, discuss a program of actions to strengthen compliance with the country’s commitment to reduce the country’s total emissions by 25% by 2030. The date and place of this meeting will be announced.

  1. c) About the TC ruling:

A panel on this sentence in light of the principle of prevention or precaution, preferably to be held at the Academy of Science of the Dominican Republic, with the participation of renowned lawyers and environmentalists.

To contact international entities so that they can react to this ruling and consider the possibility of acceding to international instances and jurisdictions so that they may judge or give their opinion on the jurisprudence of this ruling, which denies access to the constitutional process of protection to the defense of environmental law and restricts it to administrative and other ordinary contentious proceedings. Explore the possibility of opening proceedings before the Inter-American Court of Rights on this sentence.

We would like to take this opportunity to inform you that on Thursday, Thursday, 28th, the ADP met with INAFOCAM to present the Program. INAFOCAM agrees to participate in the Program, especially under the auspices of the Diploma. For tomorrow, the President of the ADP, Eduardo Hidalgo, will hold a meeting with the Vice-Minister of Education, Fran Cáceres and other officials from the portfolio, to present the Program. Also on Thursday, October 5, a delegation from the ADP, chaired by Professor Hidalgo, will also meet with the director of the National Climate Change Council and the Clean Development Mechanism, Ernesto Reyna Alcántara, for the same purpose.

Tomorrow, Friday, September 28, ADP President Eduardo Hidalgo will hold a meeting with Vice Minister of Education Fran Cáceres and other portfolio officials to present the Program.

Also on Thursday, October 5, a delegation of the ADP, chaired by Professor Hidalgo, will also meet with the director of the National Climate Change Council and the Clean Development Mechanism, Ernesto Reyna Alcántara, with the same purpose

Enrique de León

ADP-26-09-17-02 ADP-26-09-17-03 ADP-26-09-17-04 ADP-26-09-17-01

(Español) ORGANIZACIONES AMBIENTALISTAS CELEBRAN QUE POR FIN PAIS RATIFIQUE ACUERDO DE PARIS SOBRE CAMBIO CLIMATICO

Sorry, this entry is only available in European Spanish.

Speech by Andrea Sanhueza, Elected Representative of the Public (Chile), regarding the regressive development of the 7th Meeting of the Negotiating Committee for a Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Buenos Aires, Argentina,

August 2, 2017

Good afternoon esteemed delegates, and those watching via the live streaming.

The people and organizations of the Public present at this meeting are extremely concerned and frustrated by the progress of the negotiations. The vision that inspired the Rio + 20, P10 Declaration, which was to ensure the effective implementation of access rights in the region, is being lost.

Principio10-Andrea Sanhueza -7ma reunionWe have made a significant effort to accompany States in this process since 2012, hoping to achieve regional standards. Everyday thousands of people suffer pollution, loss of their natural resources, and even life as is the case of many environmental advocates. These people are waiting for an answer.

From the beginning, certain sectors of the public criticized the process because they observed a risk of regression regarding the standards already reached in the region. Today, regression is becoming a reality.

We see regression in the regime of exemptions that has been introduced to the text, which allows states more possibilities to deny information. Likewise, the text does not establish any category of environmental information that should always be disclosed, as is the case of pollutant emissions.

The text about access to environmental information is regressive and, therefore, unacceptable to the public. We feel it necessary to evaluate the degree of regression of the text negotiated so far.

The direction of the negotiation cannot continue in this manner. We want to explicitly state our minimum demands for participation and justice.

In participation, the text should GUARANTEE the right to participate, but we still see countries that propose verbs as to facilitate, promote and encourage. We want to emphasize that we are facing a rights-based approach, and States have an obligation to ensure them.

Participation must be early to effectively influence environmental decision-making processes. We notice that several governments want to dilute the text and do not want to talk about early involvement or advocacy. Late participation, which is a fait accompli, is not participation.

Regarding the right to access to justice, what is fundamental is the extensive active legitimation that allows any person or organization to access justice to protect the environment. In addition, preventive measures are essential to avoid environmental damage.

The text should also include full guarantees for environmental defenders.

We have reached a turning point. To go ahead we demand a negotiation in good faith. Good faith implies the creation of regional standards that improve the current reality. It seems to us that those countries that are not prepared to build robust regional standards will clear the way for countries that do have a real commitment to sustainable development and people.

It is time to define the binding nature of the agreement. The public is unwilling to occupy these chairs by observing how standards are lowered and rights diminished. However, we are willing to continue working with progressive proposals that recover the vision that inspired this initiative.

The Public Express Grave Concerns About the Regressive Development of the Ongoing Principle 10 Negotiations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 2, 2017ǀ Karetta Crooks Charles

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Members of the Public are saddened after several of their text proposals on Articles 6 and 7 that deal with ‘Access to Information’ and the ‘Generation and dissemination of environmental information’ have been lost. The blows came on day 2 of the Seventh Meeting of the Negotiating Committee of The Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Participation and Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), being held at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship in Buenos Aires, Argentina from July 31 – August 4, 2017.

Principio 10 - Danielle Andrade-Goffe-7ma reunionDanielle Andrade-Goffe Elected Representative of the Public (Jamaica), clearly expressed the public’s concerns about the regressive path the negotiation has taken. She said:

Having a clear set of exemptions and specific types of information that would never be exempt are core elements of setting a regional standard for this access to environmental information regime, and currently we have lost these elements. The unwillingness of the countries to adopt a regional standard for exemptions is disappointing. Of course it is hard work to get an agreement and change current legislation but that is at the heart of what international negotiations is about. Not patting ourselves on the back and acknowledging what we have already done and that no further work is left to be done. We are talking about improving access rights. There are some countries where regimes may prevent access to critical information and they don’t even have mandatory proactive release. There are other countries – Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, who have no established regime for access to information. We risk losing faith in the process. Our high hopes that we had in the beginning for the realization of a true standard have dropped considerably. We must also remember that there are others who are looking towards this process – for example other regions in the world willing to develop their own regional standards.”

Despite the feeling of gloom hanging over the members of the public from Latin America and the Caribbean in attendance, they remain resolute in their commitment to offer their expertise to ensure that progressive standards are achieved at the end of the Principle 10 negotiations. However, their will is not enough and as such governments must show the political fortitude needed to move the process forward. The heart of Principle 10 is the protection of the rights of access to information, participation and justice on environmental matters for the approximately 650 million people who call the LAC region their home and rely on their environment for their livelihood and very survival.

The negotiations can be followed live at http://negociacionp10.cepal.org/7/en/node/14. To learn more about Principle 10 visit www.lacp10.org. Countries willing to be a part of this process can simply contact ECLAC at principio10.lac@cepal.com.

 

Contacts:

 

Andrea Sanhueza
Main Elected Representative of the Public (Chile)
andreasanhuezae@gmail.com

 

Danielle Andrade-Goffe
Main Elected Representative of the Public (Jamaica)
dandrade.law@gmail.com

 

Karetta Crooks Charles
Alternate Elected Representative of the Public (St. Lucia)
karetta.charles@gmail.com

 

Another Caribbean Country Seeks to Raise the Bar

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 31, 2017ǀ Karetta Crooks Charles

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Saint Lucia has attended a few meetings as an Observer of the Principle 10 negotiations geared at reaching an agreement which will give citizens in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) an opportunity to be involved from the onset in the decision-making process on environmental matters. But today was different, as the Permanent Secretary in the Department of Sustainable Development, Ms. Valerie Leon officially announced that Saint Lucia has joined the process thereby making them the 24th  signatory country to this ambitious initiative. The announcement was made on the first day of the seventh meeting of the negotiating committee of the regional agreement on access to information, participation and justice in environmental matters in LAC being held at Palacio San Martín, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship in Buenos Aires, Argentina from July 31 – August 4, 2017.

Principio10-Otro país caribeño busca elevar la vara-Picture1

Valerie Leon – Permanent Secretary in the Department of Sustainable Development (Saint Lucia)

According to Ms. Leon, “This marks the beginning of another important step in this process, as we now commit to working towards building the capacity of our national institutions and enhancing our legislative framework at the national level, to effectively implement this regional instrument and to facilitate progress on access rights.” Furthermore, she said, “The Government of Saint Lucia applauds the sterling efforts of the Saint Lucia National Trust. The Trust remains very instrumental in this process and the Government looks forward to continued collaboration with them, as well as other government agencies and the Saint Lucian public in general, as we remain cognizant that this is only the beginning.”

Principio10-Otro país caribeño busca elevar la vara-Picture2

Danielle Andrade-Goffe – Elected Representative of the Public (Jamaica)

Other highlights of the negotiation included an Opening Ceremony where two of the Elected Representatives of the Public; Danielle Andrade-Goffe of Jamaica and Andrés Napoli of Argentina joined Government delegates and the Technical Secretariat for the process, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) in delivering remarks. Mrs. Andrade-Goffe made an impassioned intervention which called for better implementation of access rights. She said, “In the last five years since we began this journey, social conflicts in the LAC region have been escalating. Global Witness in their new report ‘Defenders of the Earth – Global Killings of Land and Environmental Defenders’ noted that 200 environmental defenders were killed in 2016 as a consequence of defending their land, rivers and forests from industries. 60% of those murdered were from Latin America. And while we in the Caribbean may not have as many grievous incidences, we are not unaffected. We are all one people because we are equally dependent on this planet we call home. Approximately 16 people died last year while protecting the Amazon forest from logging; the Amazon which we commonly refer to as the lungs of the earth because of the amount of oxygen generated by its lush forests. They should not stand alone when they are protecting the very air that we breathe”.

Meanwhile, Andrés Napoli said, “It is no coincidence that this process is blossoming at a time when the international community embarks on an ambitious path towards sustainable development. The full implementation of Principle 10 is undoubtedly at the heart of the 2030 agenda, since it ensures that all persons, especially those excluded or vulnerable, have reliable access to information and can effectively participate in decision-making processes, especially those in which their living conditions are affected, and that they can access justice; allowing a fairer distribution of the costs and benefits of development.”

The negotiations can be followed live at http://negociacionp10.cepal.org/7/en/node/14. To learn more about Principle 10 visit www.lacp10.org. Countries willing to be a part of this transformative process can simply contact ECLAC at principio10.lac@cepal.com.

Contacts:
Andrea Sanhueza
Main Elected Representative of the Public (Chile)
andreasanhuezae@gmail.com

Danielle Andrade-Goffe
Main Elected Representative of the Public (Jamaica)
dandrade.law@gmail.com

Karetta Crooks Charles
Alternate Elected Representative of the Public (St. Lucia)
karetta.charles@gmail.com

Opening Remarks by Andrés Napoli, Alternate Elected Representative of the Public (Argentina), at the 7th Meeting of the Negotiating Committee for a Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Buenos Aires, Argentina,

July 31, 2017.

Good morning everyone. I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of Argentina’s civil society, to welcome the delegates and representatives from the Latin America and Caribbean countries, members of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), representatives from international organizations present here today, representatives from the public of various countries from the region, the public from our country here with us, as well as all those who are following the transmission online from various places.

Principio10-Andrés Napoli-7ma reunionAs part of Argentina’s civil society, we are very pleased to welcome this new meeting of the Negotiating Committee – Principle 10 Agreement in Buenos Aires and, at the same time, to be directly involved in the construction of a highly innovative environmental agreement, with a rights-based perspective, but also having significant participation from the public in its development.

It is no coincidence that this process is blossoming at a time when the international community embarks on an ambitious path towards sustainable development. The full implementation of Principle 10 is undoubtedly at the heart of the 2030 agenda, since it ensures that all persons, especially those excluded or vulnerable, have reliable access to information and can effectively participate in decision-making processes, especially those in which their living conditions are affected, and that they can access justice; allowing a fairer distribution of the costs and benefits of development.

This path, launched at the Rio + 20 summit in 2012, was one of the responses given by countries to the explosive increase of environmental conflicts in the region, and the millions of people who suffer the consequences of pollution and pressure on natural resources.

However, as my colleague from Jamaica, Danielle Andrade pointed out, the situation in Latin America and the Caribbean shows that environmental conflict is far from diminishing; it has considerably increased.

In this sense, the sustainable development agenda includes, in a substantive manner, processes of informed and participatory dialogue, an issue that has often collided with the interests of those who see the participation and involvement of the public as an obstacle to the realization of their projects.

This is particularly relevant at a time when many countries in our region are seeking investments for the execution of works and projects which, even though, they may be key to meeting the needs of economic development and improving the quality of life of the population, they cannot be carried out without the maximum precautions and safeguards in environmental matters, and with the necessary and indispensable participation of the public, as well as the consent from communities that inhabit the territories.

This is why we come to this new meeting with the expectation that agreements can be reached to build a robust instrument, guaranteeing the solid protection of standards for access rights, towards a solid sustainable development agenda in the region.

Argentina, when assuming the presidency of the 7th  Negotiation Meeting, also assumed the challenge of conducting the process in a fast and effective manner, while maintaining the substantial aspects that guarantee access rights, and with the high standard of public participation that the process has exhibited thus far.

Issues on which negotiations are still pending, are very significant: a decision on the binding nature of the agreement has not yet been taken, and discussions on mechanisms for its implementation have not yet begun.

Still pending is the final text of Articles 6 to 9 which contain the substantial part that defines the scope of the rights and obligations established in the agreement.

For this reason, regional diplomats and civil society involved in the process both face a crucial challenge: that the rights enshrined in the agreement do not become a constellation of abstractions of doubtful character, but that they respond to the colossal environmental challenges of our time.

We have collaborated in a fruitful way throughout these five years of intense negotiations, with representatives of governments and civil society. It has been a learning process; we have built bridges of understanding and bonds of trust, having always placed mutual respect above all.

I believe it is no mistake to say that this negotiation has been growing and getting stronger in each instance, and that the process is solid enough to produce results that can be translated into a robust and legally binding agreement; contributing, above all, to the consolidation of democracy in the region.

Thank you.

Opening Remarks by Danielle Andrade-Goffe, Elected Representative of the Public (Jamaica), at the 7th Meeting of the Negotiating Committee for a Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Buenos Aires,

Argentina, July 31, 2017.

Thank you to ECLAC and the Government of Argentina for organizing this seventh negotiation meeting for the regional agreement on access rights and for this opportunity to make opening remarks.

Principio10-Daniel Andrade-Goffe -7ma reunionWe, the Elected Representatives of the Public, would like to use this opportunity to share our reflections on the process so far and the possibilities that lie ahead.

This process began 5 years ago in 2012 with the signing of the Declaration by 10 insightful countries – only one country at that time was from the Caribbean. Today we have 24 signatory countries with the most recent addition being St. Lucia –making it the 9th Caribbean country to join.

These countries did not set out blindly on this journey to where we are now – we of course had the foundation that is the Rio Declaration. But these countries also realized that a vision was necessary in order to travel the road to effective and meaningful access rights for their people. Recalling the words of the Lima Vision crafted and adopted at the beginning of this process… “that an instrument for Latin America and the Caribbean will contribute to ensuring timely and effective access to environmental information, participation in decisions that affect the environment and access to environmental matters for all.” This Vision recognized:

  1. That access rights is important for strengthening and deepening democracy and is essential for governing natural resources;
  2. That a right to a healthy environment is important for poverty eradication and preservation for the environment for present and future generations;
  3. That  it is necessary to promote participation among all sectors of society; and
  1. That countries will be guided by the principle to advance progressively towards the full implementation of access rights.

This earnest intention to achieve this vision is reflected even in the progressive participatory rules of the

process, being, the election of the representatives of the public, the maintenance of continuous dialogue between these representatives and presiding officers to ensure that the concerns of the public are continually addressed and the freedom of the public to attend the negotiations and to be heard.

As we near the end of this process, we must not falter and we must not fail but remain steadfast in this vision of a better future with progressive standards for the people of our region. It is even more necessary and more important now than ever before. All around us, everyday there is evidence of the need for better implementation of access rights.

In the last five years since we began this journey, social conflicts in Latin America and the Caribbean have been escalating. Global Witness in their new report ‘Defenders of the Earth – Global Killings of Land and Environmental Defenders’ noted that 200 environmental defenders were killed just last year alone as a consequence of defending their land, rivers and forests from industries. 60% of those murdered were from Latin America. This does not include the countless threats and other act of intimidation meant to stifle voices of opposition. And while we in the Caribbean may not have as many grievous incidences, we are not unaffected. We are all one people because we are equally dependent on this planet we call home. Approximately 16 people died last year while protecting the Amazon forest from logging; the Amazon which we commonly refer to as the lungs of the earth because of the amount of oxygen generated by its lush forests. They should not stand alone when they are protecting the very air that we breathe.

Borrowing the words from the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Goal 16 – to obtain peaceful societies we must promote equal access to justice for all, the adoption of inclusive, participatory and representative decisions that meet the needs at all levels; and we must ensure public access to information and protecting fundamental freedom.

As we begin negotiations this week including on a provision in article 9 to protect environmental defenders, we call upon you to remember the Vision and to let it be your guide. This regional agreement presents us with the opportunity to overcome these false geographical barriers and bridge the gaps in implementation of access rights to ensure that we arrive at a progressive regional standard attainable by all. We do this not by settling for the lowest common denominator but by incorporating the best legislation in the region in the area of access rights and by establishing capacity building partnerships and mechanisms. The public stands ready to support and collaborate positively with the representatives of government in this process to achieve this, our collective vision.

Thank you.

P10 Declaration for SDG Forum with supporters

The SDG and Principle 10
A key partnership for achieving a sustainable development.

 

There will be no sustainable development without the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (ODS) or without the rights of access to information, access to justice and participation on environmental issues, known as access rights.

The Agenda for Sustainable Development began globally in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 with the Conference on Environment and Development. First were the Conventions, the Agenda 21 and the Rio Declaration, then Rio + 20 with “The Future We Want” and now 25 years later, we have the SDG as a common global platform.

The Agenda 2030 and the Regional Agreement for Principle 10 saw the light together in Rio plus 20 and this Forum is an unparalleled opportunity for them to be strengthened and implemented together. Both processes are the result of the global political re-articulation of the environmental agenda that emerged from the Rio + 20 Summit…

Download complete document

Observatory on Principle 10 in Latin America and the Caribbean

New ECLAC Observatory on Principle 10 in Latin America and the Caribbean
Launched in Brasilia on the occasion of the Sixth Meeting of the Negotiating Committee for the Regional Agreement on Principle 10 on March 20, 2017, the Observatory of Principle 10 in Latin America and the Caribbean (http://observatoriop10.cepal.org/en ) Makes available to the countries and the public outstanding references on the rights of access to information, participation and justice in environmental matters contained in international treaties, laws and policies as well as relevant jurisprudence on the subject.

The information available at the Observatory is organized by countries, rights, themes, policy instruments, jurisprudence and treaties, which are combined in cross-data and visualized through dynamic maps.

The Observatory emerges as an initiative of ECLAC to contribute to a better knowledge, dissemination and implementation of the rights of access to information, public participation and access to justice in environmental matters enshrined in Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration on The Environment and Development.

 

 

Click on the following icons to get to the section of interest

 

 

“The Observatory analyses legislation, policies, jurisprudence and treaties that guarantee the full enjoyment by all persons of the rights to have access to information, public participation and justice in environmental matters, as enshrined in Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration.

Division of Sustainable Development and Human Settlements Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

 

http://www.cepal.org/en/work-areas/sustainable-development-and-human-settlements

 

ESTABLISHMENT OF PERMANENT SURVEILLANCE OF THE CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES UNTIL THE PARIS AGREEMENT ON CLIMATE CHANGE IS APPROVED

Press release,
Tuesday, March 28, 2017,
Santo Domingo, D.N.

Civil society organizations and environmentalists who advocate ratification of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change decided in the morning to maintain a permanent vigilance over the Chamber of Deputies until this body approves this agreement.

Representatives of twenty-five organizations made the decision to establish a permanent watchdog on the Chamber of Deputies, after today’s session of this body did not hear the report of the commission that studied the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

The organizations that were represented in the morning are the NGO Alliance, the Jaragua Group, the Dominican Teachers Association (ADP), the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH), the Dominican Environmental Consortium (CAD), the Ecological Foundation Macorís Verde, the Institute of Lawyers for the Defense of the Environment (INSAPROMA), Guakia Ambiente and the National Committee to Combat Climate Change (CNLCC), among others.

“Although the president of the Chamber of Deputies, Lucia Medina had announced that this agreement would be heard in today’s session, this was not the case, and we fear that if we do not maintain public’s attention and vigilance over this body, it will be heard in the week of 7 Thursday, ” they said.

They reported that they met with Deputy Ricardo Contreras, who promised that he would do everything possible, along with other deputies and disputed from different groups, so that the Paris Agreement be known in the morning session.

They said that the authorities have generally shown no sense of urgency about the need for the Dominican Republic to ratify the Paris Agreement despite the fact that the country has been suffering from climate change since last year.
“The current rains and flooding of the north coast, the passage of Hurricane Matthew, the drought that affected much of the country until last year and the heavy rainfall in November are all extreme events caused by climate change,” they said.

They indicated that they have been campaigning for about six months for this agreement to be approved by the public authorities and only the approval by the Chamber of Deputies is lacking so that it may become law and the Dominican Republic becomes State number 137 to ratify it.

They recalled that on February 8, the Senate approved this agreement in a single reading and unanimously, offering an example of environmental awareness.

They affirmed that almost all the island states that are most vulnerable to climate change ratified the Paris Agreement in the first four months of last year, and only have not done so, from all the islands of the world, Haiti, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic.

They assured that the organizations will be vigilant and pressing for the Chamber of Deputies to approve this agreement. “If it is necessary for us to move to the National Congress, we will do so, but the Dominican Republic can no longer postpone the ratification of the Paris Agreement.”

NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE, CNLCC

Establecen vigilancia permanente a la Cámara de Diputados hasta que apruebe el Acuerdo de París DSC-003
El diputado Ricardo Contreras recibió en la mañana de hoy a los representantes de veinticinco organizaciones de la sociedad civil y ambientalistas que abogan por la aprobación del Acuerdo de París.